Think Pink: Pink Moon 7 Review (Part 5) by Matthew J. Hunnicutt

by
Chanelle in Posted October, 10 2015

Think Pink: Pink Moon 7 Review (Part 5) by Matthew J. Hunnicutt

The author (left), Matthew Hunnicutt, rocking out Saturday night with fellow RRR staffer Jason Wade. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.
The author (left), Matthew Hunnicutt, rocking out Saturday night with fellow RRR staffer Jason Wade. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

Saturday, Sept 19:
Three hours after serendipitously stumbling into a wayward hammock, I wake feeling a new man, the anticipation of Saturday rousing me, perhaps prematurely, from my slumber. I’m just in time to catch Gold Rush playing to a mostly-seated afternoon crowd. An acoustic string trio, this upbeat, optimistic romanticism is exactly what a body needs on a Saturday afternoon following a night of such magnitude. A talented young burner spins a doused bow staff while Brooke Brio sits next to a sign advertising free body painting.

Goldrush Saturday afternoon w/ staff-spinning awesomeness! Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.
Goldrush Saturday afternoon w/ staff-spinning awesomeness! Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

I gather my wits and head down to the pond for a dip with Justin Shear of Toxic Moxie. In his words, “There is you before you get in the pond, and then there is you after you get in the pond. It’s like you’re not even the same person.” Indeed, I emerge from the cleansing water with new life and vigor. Bats Dynamic String Band is on The Shangri-la stage (SLS) so I head up for a closer listen. They dance a line that crosses country and bluegrass and bring a little hard rock along for the ride. The three-piece is comprised of an iconic washtub bass, adorned with the rack of an 8-point buck, mandolin and acoustic guitar. The latter two are run through pedal boards that allow them to achieve screeching electric guitar effects while still looking like a Hazard County house band. When I arrive, they are leading the crowd in a fancy dance step that involves hopping on one foot while karate chopping and swinging a Nunchaku.
Adam Geschwindner of Bats Dynamic String Band Saturday afternoon on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.
Adam Geschwindner of Bats Dynamic String Band Saturday afternoon on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

Dale and the ZDubs return for another SLS set while Shadow Girl Sound Collective prepares to cut deep experimental grooves into the Loco Pickle Stage (LPS). Imaginary Sons head over to the Shangri-La stage, where all who missed their LPS performance are now gathered to see if the rumors are true. The band is joined by Seth and Jess, who express their sincere appreciation and gratitude to everyone, from staff to individual campers, for making this such a great weekend.
Jess & Seth join Imaginary Sons and Mitch Kordella from Toxic Moxie on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.
Jess & Seth join Imaginary Sons and Mitch Kordella from Toxic Moxie on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

They are followed by prominent performances from Telesma and Tweed. I head over the Old House Stage (OHS) to catch The Hornitz, who have just “What I nee-eed.” This Boston-based duo uses human beat-box, bass trombone, tenor saxophone, keyboards, and live looping to create a sound so big, you have to see it to believe it’s not a full ensemble.
The Hornitz. Photo by Nicole Wade.
The Hornitz. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

Glam Disco-Punk rockers Toxic Moxie take the SLS for their second performance of the weekend, and the crowd is electrified. An endless shower of balloons hovers overhead like latex popcorn. This band has been ‘barfing’ (their words) EP’s all over Richmond and their hard work is clearly paying dividends. Lead guitarist Justin Shear shreds at a level newly attained, while bassist and synth player Mitch cranks out earworms you are sure to carry around for days, and the lot of them jump around like their heads are on fire and their asses are catchin’.

Toxic Moxie Saturday night on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Lauren Kent
Toxic Moxie Saturday night on the Shangri-la stage. Photo by Lauren Kent for Radio Rubber Room.

M.H. And His Orchestra. What can I say about this group that hasn’t already been said about John Travolta’s midriff? They’re hot, unpredictable, and not suitable for children. M.H. is how I imagine Paul Rudd’s Brian Fantana and Elvis’ love child. Vaudevillian is a term frequently, and aptly, applied to this talented group of performing artists.

M.H. & His Orchestra Saturday night on the Old House Stage. Billy Wallace of Jet Trails Media on lights.  Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.
M.H. & His Orchestra Saturday night on the Old House Stage. Billy Wallace of Jet Trails Media on lights. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

A brief list of things you can expect to encounter at a show: steel guitar, accordion, synthesizers, piano; cigarettes; baritone, tenor, & alto saxophone; viola; didgeridoo; leisure suits; trumpet, flugel-horn, & euphonium; more cigarettes; violin; glockenspiel; ukulele; clarinet, singing saw, and other loud noises. More than a group of fantastic musicians, they are troupe of engrossing entertainers. Catch them while you can – If there is any justice left in this world, this kind of talent won’t go undiscovered for long.
M.H. & His Orchestra Saturday night on the Old House Stage. Billy Wallace of Jet Trails Media on Lights. Photo by Lauren Kent for Radio Rubber Room.
M.H. & His Orchestra Saturday night on the Old House Stage. Billy Wallace of Jet Trails Media on Lights. Photo by Lauren Kent for Radio Rubber Room.

Veteran bass heads Plaeground keep the party going with their primal EDM sound that is at the same time Earthbound and extra-terrestrial, or in their own words, Electrodelic Tribal Futurebass.
RVA Grungers Venus Guytrap rock us into the dawn with a blaze of sequins and a powerful wave of post-Grunge sound. A bleary-eyed on-looker describes it as “Radiohead mixed with Nirvana,” and I’m obliged to agree.
Gillian Dykes of Venus Guytrap and Kyle Hermann of Imaginary Sons after the Venus Guytrap set Sat night/Sunday morning. Photo by Nicole Wade.
Gillian Dykes of Venus Guytrap and Kyle Hermann of Imaginary Sons after the Venus Guytrap set Sat night/Sunday morning. Photo by Nicole Wade for Radio Rubber Room.

I have to admit they are the last act I will remember from Saturday/Sunday morning. To be fair, I have made it through to almost noon everyday so far, but my body is beginning to revolt. The constant summits to various stages, undertaken with almost zealous enthusiasm, has left my weary body teetering aloft wet spaghetti noodles. I won’t remember going to bed when I wake up and will, in fact, be surprised to find myself in camp, the product of a journey the details of which remain a mystery.